Things to avoid

Once you’ve found a career path that you are interested in, the last thing you want to do is to mess it up. And “messing it up” could be a number of things, from giving a bad impression to current or potential employers, to having a confusing employment history. The important thing to know, though, is that messing up here and there is OKAY. Because when it comes making smart career choices, it’s not about being perfect, but about setting yourself up for long term success.

  • You are good at the job, perform well, often even better than your colleagues - but hardly anyone seems to notice and the rise remains. One possible problem: you are a professional being low-key. Your own achievements are not mentioned or talked small, you are not pushing in the center and are not looking for the big stage. Unfortunately, in the job, low-key employees are often overlooked and even outdated by mediocre colleagues who stir the drumstick. We explain why being low-key will have a hard time and what the humble ones can do to escape the consequences of being low-key.


  • On the way to working life, there are so many stumbling blocks. This already starts with the fact that the initial situation is not the same for everyone. Children from poorer households are still disadvantaged. However, there are many things that you can do wrong yourself. Especially job starters, but also job changers commit mistakes that can break their neck in the end. So just to make sure this does not happen to you, we have collected the most common stumbling blocks for you ...


  • Cancel job interview: Applicants often send countless letters and CVs in the high phase of their job search. There are a variety of companies that offer a suitable job and with each application increases the chance to finally get the longed-for dream job. Many invitations to face-to-face conversations are the declared goal, but that also means that you have the option of not being able to handle all appointments. If in doubt, only to cancel a job interview. But how do you do that properly? The positive and professional impression should be preserved in the event that the call should be made up. We answer the most important and most frequently asked questions and show what to look out for when you cancel a job interview ...

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
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  • Job-hopping, generally defined as spending less than two years in a position, can be an easy path to a higher salary — but experts caution that bouncing from position to position can be a serious red flag to prospective employers. Unfortunately, the majority of workers — 64 percent — favor job-hopping, according to a new survey by our recruitment agency in Thailand, Fischer & Partners. That’s up 22% from a similar survey four years ago. Not surprisingly, millennial workers felt the most favorably about changing jobs frequently, with 75% of employees under 34 stating that job-hopping could benefit their careers.


Things to avoid

Once you’ve found a career path that you are interested in, the last thing you want to do is to mess it up. And “messing it up” could be a number of things, from giving a bad impression to current or potential employers, to having a confusing employment history. The important thing to know, though, is that messing up here and there is OKAY. Because when it comes making smart career choices, it’s not about being perfect, but about setting yourself up for long term success.