Job-hopping

A job hopper is someone who works briefly in one position after another rather than staying at any one job or organization long-term. Although most people change jobs more frequently than was the case in the past, job hoppers do so more often. Job hopping is a pattern of changing companies every year or two of one's own volition rather than as a result of something like a layoff or company closure.

  • Job-hopping, generally defined as spending less than two years in a position, can be an easy path to a higher salary — but experts caution that bouncing from position to position can be a serious red flag to prospective employers. Unfortunately, the majority of workers — 64 percent — favor job-hopping, according to a new survey by our recruitment agency in Thailand, Fischer & Partners. That’s up 22% from a similar survey four years ago. Not surprisingly, millennial workers felt the most favorably about changing jobs frequently, with 75% of employees under 34 stating that job-hopping could benefit their careers.


Job-hopping

Years ago, it was not uncommon for people to work for the same employer their entire careers. Historically, employers have suspected that job applicants with a lot of short stints on their resumes were unreliable. In recent decades, however, people typically change jobs at least a few times through their careers. The average Thai worker has been with his current employer for 4.6 years. For workers aged 20-34, the average is 2.3 years.

 

Some employers are still reluctant to hire job hoppers. Others, however, would prefer to see applicants with a few jobs on their resumes to those who have stayed in one job for a long time. Employers often fear such individuals are resistant to change or simply unmotivated. People who have worked in a number of different capacities and in different corporate environments, on the other hand, are likely to have a broader range of skills and be more adaptable.